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💥Good/Bad Foods Don’t Exist💥 — The notion that some foods are inherently bad (or good) is one of the dumbest things the fitness industry tries to sell you every single day. Don’t quote me on this but I am pretty sure that Twinkies don’t have souls and don’t think they have a long rap sheet if you were to look them up in public records. — Are some foods better than others? Of course. Will eating a lot of Twinkies get you closer to those washboard abs you’ve been working for? Probably not. The point of this post is to show that no food can possibly be “bad” on its own. If you want some ice cream, eat some effing ice cream. You wont die, promise. Making solid food choices 100% of the time is tough, but gets even tougher when you throw in self guilt for eating something that you’ve seen characterized as bad. — Its time to reframe how we think about food. Picture foods without labeling them as “good” or “bad” in your head. Instead, before you eat any food think about whether that food will take you closer or further away from your goals. Thats it. Ill let you in on a secret, too: its OKAY to choose a food every once in a while thats wont take you closer to your goals. Now, if you start making those decisions rather frequently you will know exactly why you didn’t make any progress since the last time you measured. — Life is too short to cut (x) food out because someone in the industry hiding behind a keyboard read a study performed with 3 males (who were also dogs) and two female cats that showed eating bananas are bad for you. You’ve never seen a heavy person who got that way by solely eating too many bananas. — Save this post for when you feel yourself slipping back into the old habit of labeling foods as “gaod” or “bad”. Lets kick that habit today, y’all.❤️

💥Good/Bad Foods Don’t Exist💥 — The notion that some foods are inherently bad (or good) is one of the dumbest things the fitness industry tries to sell you every single day. Don’t quote me on this but I am pretty sure that Twinkies don’t have souls and don’t think they have a long rap sheet if you were to look them up in public records. — Are some foods better than others? Of course. Will eating a lot of Twinkies get you closer to those washboard abs you’ve been working for? Probably not. The point of this post is to show that no food can possibly be “bad” on its own. If you want some ice cream, eat some effing ice cream. You wont die, promise. Making solid food choices 100% of the time is tough, but gets even tougher when you throw in self guilt for eating something that you’ve seen characterized as bad. — Its time to reframe how we think about food. Picture foods without labeling them as “good” or “bad” in your head. Instead, before you eat any food think about whether that food will take you closer or further away from your goals. Thats it. Ill let you in on a secret, too: its OKAY to choose a food every once in a while thats wont take you closer to your goals. Now, if you start making those decisions rather frequently you will know exactly why you didn’t make any progress since the last time you measured. — Life is too short to cut (x) food out because someone in the industry hiding behind a keyboard read a study performed with 3 males (who were also dogs) and two female cats that showed eating bananas are bad for you. You’ve never seen a heavy person who got that way by solely eating too many bananas. — Save this post for when you feel yourself slipping back into the old habit of labeling foods as “gaod” or “bad”. Lets kick that habit today, y’all.❤️

By | 2018-05-19T06:14:47+00:00 May 18th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Pain? Play the Long Game — I’ve posted something similar before, but to be honest, this topic needs to be talked about dang near daily! — Are you going to be sore from workouts? Probably. Should that be your barometer for that workouts effectiveness? No. This is the first mental hurdle we need to get over if we are going to play the long game. — What is the long game? It’s simple, really. If you’re feeling something worse than your typical soreness, or have had the thought “I might be hurt, but not sure” more than once, allow yourself to take a couple days off from the gym. Or, at the very least, structure workouts around what may be injured. — Last time I checked missing two workouts, recovering, and being back at full strength for the next weeks training is infinitely better than actually injuring yourself trying to “push through it” because “pain is weakness leaving the body”. — I’m not saying you should skip workouts any time you’re a little tender. I’m not telling you to tell your coach to go easy on the legs because foam rolling your quads was a little uncomfortable. Instead, try to work around it, have an active recovery day or go full blown regeneration with a sports massage. — I simply want you to listen to your body, put the pre workout down for a couple of days and save yourself the agony of getting injured bad enough to where missing gym sessions isn’t a decision you can make but rather one your body makes for you. — #injuryprevention #smarttraining #workoutprogram #healthylifter #workout💪 #fitnesstips #workouttips #trainer #strengthcoach #reformedathletes

Pain? Play the Long Game — I’ve posted something similar before, but to be honest, this topic needs to be talked about dang near daily! — Are you going to be sore from workouts? Probably. Should that be your barometer for that workouts effectiveness? No. This is the first mental hurdle we need to get over if we are going to play the long game. — What is the long game? It’s simple, really. If you’re feeling something worse than your typical soreness, or have had the thought “I might be hurt, but not sure” more than once, allow yourself to take a couple days off from the gym. Or, at the very least, structure workouts around what may be injured. — Last time I checked missing two workouts, recovering, and being back at full strength for the next weeks training is infinitely better than actually injuring yourself trying to “push through it” because “pain is weakness leaving the body”. — I’m not saying you should skip workouts any time you’re a little tender. I’m not telling you to tell your coach to go easy on the legs because foam rolling your quads was a little uncomfortable. Instead, try to work around it, have an active recovery day or go full blown regeneration with a sports massage. — I simply want you to listen to your body, put the pre workout down for a couple of days and save yourself the agony of getting injured bad enough to where missing gym sessions isn’t a decision you can make but rather one your body makes for you. — #injuryprevention #smarttraining #workoutprogram #healthylifter #workout💪 #fitnesstips #workouttips #trainer #strengthcoach #reformedathletes

By | 2018-05-18T06:04:14+00:00 May 17th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Better Workouts With Autoregulation — 🗣Before diving in I want you to know that I do not recommend this for beginners, only intermediate and up. Build a good base with a standard program first. :) — I also want to note that this type of training is not for everyone — Thus far my clients have been about 60% in favor of it because they like the idea of having a number of reps set in stone. — With that out of the way, I’ll tell you why I like Autoregulation and the theory behind it. — Autoregulation allows every person doing the workout to get what they need out of it. What I mean by that is that when there is a specific number of sets and reps such as 3×10 in the example above that can be too much for one and not near enough for the other. For argument sake lets assume that we will be working with a fairly set weight, so going down to half of your regular working weight just to get (x) reps wont be the goal here. — Its important to set some parameters first. When using Autoregulation you should have a “stopping” point. Training to failure in this setting means perfect reps. If your technique will probably fail next rep — rack it. I like using 3/fail week 1, 2/fail week 2, 1/fail week 3 or similar. If you are using 3/fail and you think you have 15 perfect reps, you’d stop at 12. Make sense? Thanks @rpstrength for turning me on to this concept and making me give it more thought. — If you’re trying to gain lean muscle, in order to be in the hypertrophy rep range you may estimate — even better if you know — your 10RM, set it a little lower for week 1 and progress from there depending on how many reps you do. For hypertrophy its best to stay anywhere from 8-15 reps, so, if you get 18 reps on set 1 you could add more weight, if you only got 5? Go down a bit. This works for whatever training phase you’re in, you’d just adjust the RM you’re working off of (i.e 5,6,8 etc.). — If you’ve tried both methods which do you prefer? Let me know!

Better Workouts With Autoregulation — 🗣Before diving in I want you to know that I do not recommend this for beginners, only intermediate and up. Build a good base with a standard program first. :) — I also want to note that this type of training is not for everyone — Thus far my clients have been about 60% in favor of it because they like the idea of having a number of reps set in stone. — With that out of the way, I’ll tell you why I like Autoregulation and the theory behind it. — Autoregulation allows every person doing the workout to get what they need out of it. What I mean by that is that when there is a specific number of sets and reps such as 3x10 in the example above that can be too much for one and not near enough for the other. For argument sake lets assume that we will be working with a fairly set weight, so going down to half of your regular working weight just to get (x) reps wont be the goal here. — Its important to set some parameters first. When using Autoregulation you should have a “stopping” point. Training to failure in this setting means perfect reps. If your technique will probably fail next rep — rack it. I like using 3/fail week 1, 2/fail week 2, 1/fail week 3 or similar. If you are using 3/fail and you think you have 15 perfect reps, you’d stop at 12. Make sense? Thanks @rpstrength for turning me on to this concept and making me give it more thought. — If you’re trying to gain lean muscle, in order to be in the hypertrophy rep range you may estimate — even better if you know — your 10RM, set it a little lower for week 1 and progress from there depending on how many reps you do. For hypertrophy its best to stay anywhere from 8-15 reps, so, if you get 18 reps on set 1 you could add more weight, if you only got 5? Go down a bit. This works for whatever training phase you’re in, you’d just adjust the RM you’re working off of (i.e 5,6,8 etc.). — If you’ve tried both methods which do you prefer? Let me know!

By | 2018-05-16T18:04:05+00:00 May 16th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

☄️Why You Have Bad Posture☄️ — In today’s world of desk jobs, reality TV, Pokémon GO (kidding..kinda) and sedentary lifestyles in general it’s easy to see why posture issues are so prevalent. — BUT, i think we can also attribute a lot of posture issues in those who exercise to doing too much pressing (i.e chest) and not near enough rowing/vertical pulling (i.e back/lats). If the chest and front delts become over developed, the shoulders have to go somewhere — and if your back is lacking, there’s no where to go but forward and down. — Another underrated reason for bad posture is that a lot of us often times lack self confidence. Without that, it’s easy to slouch and try to shy away from any attention being brought to us. Trust me i get that, too. My blog about my battles with anxiety and depression from last week can attest to that. FYI It’s linked in my bio if you want to read it :). — To fix our posture issues it’s very important that we row at least 2x more than we press. How you get there is up to you, whether it be more reps/sets of one exercise or if you add other back accessory moves to get there doesn’t matter so long as the ratio stays 2:1 or a bit more. — Adding more direct shoulder work for the rear delts and lower traps can also play a big role in improving posture. Add more facepulls, rear delt flyes and rows to chest to help you get there. — A great time filler where you can work on posture as well is with shoulder “prehab” moves such as variations of T’s, W’s, Y’s or A’s. Prehab just means we are trying to take care of the problems before they require REHAB. Genius, i know, i didn’t coin the term, though. I’m not that clever. 🤦‍♂️ — It takes time to correct years of bad posture, so it won’t happen overnight. Having things around that constantly remind you to work on it can help a ton — even if it seems tacky! — If you’ve had success in correcting your posture, what has worked for you? Let me know, I’m always trying to add to my toolbox. 😎

☄️Why You Have Bad Posture☄️ — In today’s world of desk jobs, reality TV, Pokémon GO (kidding..kinda) and sedentary lifestyles in general it’s easy to see why posture issues are so prevalent. — BUT, i think we can also attribute a lot of posture issues in those who exercise to doing too much pressing (i.e chest) and not near enough rowing/vertical pulling (i.e back/lats). If the chest and front delts become over developed, the shoulders have to go somewhere — and if your back is lacking, there’s no where to go but forward and down. — Another underrated reason for bad posture is that a lot of us often times lack self confidence. Without that, it’s easy to slouch and try to shy away from any attention being brought to us. Trust me i get that, too. My blog about my battles with anxiety and depression from last week can attest to that. FYI It’s linked in my bio if you want to read it :). — To fix our posture issues it’s very important that we row at least 2x more than we press. How you get there is up to you, whether it be more reps/sets of one exercise or if you add other back accessory moves to get there doesn’t matter so long as the ratio stays 2:1 or a bit more. — Adding more direct shoulder work for the rear delts and lower traps can also play a big role in improving posture. Add more facepulls, rear delt flyes and rows to chest to help you get there. — A great time filler where you can work on posture as well is with shoulder “prehab” moves such as variations of T’s, W’s, Y’s or A’s. Prehab just means we are trying to take care of the problems before they require REHAB. Genius, i know, i didn’t coin the term, though. I’m not that clever. 🤦‍♂️ — It takes time to correct years of bad posture, so it won’t happen overnight. Having things around that constantly remind you to work on it can help a ton — even if it seems tacky! — If you’ve had success in correcting your posture, what has worked for you? Let me know, I’m always trying to add to my toolbox. 😎

By | 2018-05-16T06:09:51+00:00 May 16th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Rest Periods Should Reflect Your Goals 📚 Rest periods are one of the most commonly misused and abused aspects to a workout program. There isn’t a “perfect” rest period for everyone and the truth is that your own “perfect” rest period will vary from session to session. 📚 With that being said, its still important to keep in mind the roundabout rest times based on your training goal. If you’re trying to deadlift 3x bodyweight its probably not in your best interest to only rest 30sec between sets. 📚 As a beginner I like to recommend using the general “industry standard” type guidelines listed here. I do this because: — When you’re just starting out, you don’t really *know* your limits for better or for worse so timing the period can help ensure a good workout and more importantly, athlete safety. — Secondly, it is imperative to learn how your body responds to training. In most cases it takes a few training cycles to really feel out just how much you can do and how fast you can do it while still being able to recover from sessions (if you want to nerd out, look up the term Max Recoverable Volume (MRV), I’ve been reading/studying a ton about this from @rpstrength). — Faster does not always equal better. I’d argue that a little longer rest period with more total volume lifted would win the results battle 9/10 times. But, thats why it is important to figure out your baseline before you start making those judgment calls for yourself. 📚 A general rule of thumb is that when you’re training for metabolic conditioning/endurance and for hypertrophy (lean mass gains) that loads will be lighter and rest shorter. On the flip side, general strength training and max strength training will have less volume (reps, anyway) and much longer rest times that allow you to give complete maximal effort every time. 📚 Work on finding your rest time sweet spots this week!

Rest Periods Should Reflect Your Goals 📚 Rest periods are one of the most commonly misused and abused aspects to a workout program. There isn’t a “perfect” rest period for everyone and the truth is that your own “perfect” rest period will vary from session to session. 📚 With that being said, its still important to keep in mind the roundabout rest times based on your training goal. If you’re trying to deadlift 3x bodyweight its probably not in your best interest to only rest 30sec between sets. 📚 As a beginner I like to recommend using the general “industry standard” type guidelines listed here. I do this because: — When you’re just starting out, you don’t really *know* your limits for better or for worse so timing the period can help ensure a good workout and more importantly, athlete safety. — Secondly, it is imperative to learn how your body responds to training. In most cases it takes a few training cycles to really feel out just how much you can do and how fast you can do it while still being able to recover from sessions (if you want to nerd out, look up the term Max Recoverable Volume (MRV), I’ve been reading/studying a ton about this from @rpstrength). — Faster does not always equal better. I’d argue that a little longer rest period with more total volume lifted would win the results battle 9/10 times. But, thats why it is important to figure out your baseline before you start making those judgment calls for yourself. 📚 A general rule of thumb is that when you’re training for metabolic conditioning/endurance and for hypertrophy (lean mass gains) that loads will be lighter and rest shorter. On the flip side, general strength training and max strength training will have less volume (reps, anyway) and much longer rest times that allow you to give complete maximal effort every time. 📚 Work on finding your rest time sweet spots this week!

By | 2018-05-14T18:07:17+00:00 May 14th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Love this from my boy @josiahfitness — fun fact he looks exactly like his bitmoji irl. •• Repost from @josiahfitnessI never saw my abs till I was 25! I didn’t think it was even possible to have a six pack . Let’s be honest – having a lean stomach is something a lot of you want but it might seem unattainable based off where you are now – I can really relate to this. When I was a kid I was athletic but had zero stomach definition – I held all my fat around my waist. As I entered my early college years and battled with severe depression, I packed on a ton of belly fat – It wasn’t until I invested in mentors that I began to learn how to shred the fat and stay lean, especially in my stomach area – Getting a six pack and maintaining one isn’t easy for a lot of people (including me) but you can definitely lower your bodyfat enough to be able to see stomach definition…IF you follow the steps I’ve outlined here – First things first is most definitely nutrition. We have to control our calorie intake. You can set up a flexible meal plan to help you stay on track and you can also learn how to track your food intake – Following a strength training routine is going to help you build muscle which will keep your metabolism healthy – plus it will ensure that you hold onto muscle as you strip away bodyfat. A 3 or 4 day training workout split is a great place to start – When it comes to the type of calories you eat, it’s important to get sufficient protein first. Usually I recommend .7-1g per pound of goal bodyweight. High protein intake is both a waste of money and very unhealthy. The rest of your calories should be split between fats and carbs. Some people do well with more fats and less carbs. Others are the opposite. Do what you love and what makes the most sense. Also not every day has to the same. Some days you can swap fats for carbs and Vice Versa. Hit your protein and calorie targets and you’ll be golden – Last, but not least…be PATIENT AND CONSISTENT. This stuff takes time!

Love this from my boy @josiahfitness — fun fact he looks exactly like his bitmoji irl. •• Repost from @josiahfitnessI never saw my abs till I was 25! I didn’t think it was even possible to have a six pack . Let’s be honest - having a lean stomach is something a lot of you want but it might seem unattainable based off where you are now - I can really relate to this. When I was a kid I was athletic but had zero stomach definition - I held all my fat around my waist. As I entered my early college years and battled with severe depression, I packed on a ton of belly fat - It wasn’t until I invested in mentors that I began to learn how to shred the fat and stay lean, especially in my stomach area - Getting a six pack and maintaining one isn’t easy for a lot of people (including me) but you can definitely lower your bodyfat enough to be able to see stomach definition...IF you follow the steps I’ve outlined here - First things first is most definitely nutrition. We have to control our calorie intake. You can set up a flexible meal plan to help you stay on track and you can also learn how to track your food intake - Following a strength training routine is going to help you build muscle which will keep your metabolism healthy - plus it will ensure that you hold onto muscle as you strip away bodyfat. A 3 or 4 day training workout split is a great place to start - When it comes to the type of calories you eat, it’s important to get sufficient protein first. Usually I recommend .7-1g per pound of goal bodyweight. High protein intake is both a waste of money and very unhealthy. The rest of your calories should be split between fats and carbs. Some people do well with more fats and less carbs. Others are the opposite. Do what you love and what makes the most sense. Also not every day has to the same. Some days you can swap fats for carbs and Vice Versa. Hit your protein and calorie targets and you’ll be golden - Last, but not least...be PATIENT AND CONSISTENT. This stuff takes time!

By | 2018-05-13T06:08:16+00:00 May 13th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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