Buying Organic? Know Your Labels by @reformsandc . Let’s talk about organic products and how they’re labeled. They are everywhere, and similar to the fat free phenomena of the early 2000’s where everyone thought that fat was awful for you, the same conclusion can be drawn for organic products except this time on the opposite end of the spectrum. People think that if something is labeled organic that it has to be good for you. . Wait, I thought all organic labels meant the same thing? Not necessarily. Let me explain. . There are a few different categories of “organic foods”. When you’re shopping for organic foods in the U.S., look for the “USDA Organic” seal. Only foods that are 95 to 100 percent organic (and GMO-free) can use the USDA Organic label. . 100% Organic – Foods that are completely organic or made with 100% organic ingredients may display the USDA seal. . Organic – Foods that contain at least 95% organic ingredients may display the USDA seal. . Made with organic ingredients – Foods that contain at least 70% organic ingredients will not display the USDA seal but may list specific organic ingredients on the front of the package. . Contains organic ingredients – Foods that contain less than 70% organic ingredients will not display the USDA seal but may list specific organic ingredients on the information panel of the package. . The scariest one, in my opinion, is the “Made with organic ingredients”. While they are not allowed to use the USDA Organic seal, many times seeing the word “organic” in any capacity can lead to a purchase. The issue with this is that there are still 30% of the ingredients that can be complete trash. . Just because it says “Organic” shouldn’t make it synonymous with “good for you”.

//Buying Organic? Know Your Labels by @reformsandc . Let’s talk about organic products and how they’re labeled. They are everywhere, and similar to the fat free phenomena of the early 2000’s where everyone thought that fat was awful for you, the same conclusion can be drawn for organic products except this time on the opposite end of the spectrum. People think that if something is labeled organic that it has to be good for you. . Wait, I thought all organic labels meant the same thing? Not necessarily. Let me explain. . There are a few different categories of “organic foods”. When you’re shopping for organic foods in the U.S., look for the “USDA Organic” seal. Only foods that are 95 to 100 percent organic (and GMO-free) can use the USDA Organic label. . 100% Organic – Foods that are completely organic or made with 100% organic ingredients may display the USDA seal. . Organic – Foods that contain at least 95% organic ingredients may display the USDA seal. . Made with organic ingredients – Foods that contain at least 70% organic ingredients will not display the USDA seal but may list specific organic ingredients on the front of the package. . Contains organic ingredients – Foods that contain less than 70% organic ingredients will not display the USDA seal but may list specific organic ingredients on the information panel of the package. . The scariest one, in my opinion, is the “Made with organic ingredients”. While they are not allowed to use the USDA Organic seal, many times seeing the word “organic” in any capacity can lead to a purchase. The issue with this is that there are still 30% of the ingredients that can be complete trash. . Just because it says “Organic” shouldn’t make it synonymous with “good for you”.

Buying Organic? Know Your Labels by @reformsandc . Let’s talk about organic products and how they’re labeled. They are everywhere, and similar to the fat free phenomena of the early 2000’s where everyone thought that fat was awful for you, the same conclusion can be drawn for organic products except this time on the opposite end of the spectrum. People think that if something is labeled organic that it has to be good for you. . Wait, I thought all organic labels meant the same thing? Not necessarily. Let me explain. . There are a few different categories of “organic foods”. When you’re shopping for organic foods in the U.S., look for the “USDA Organic” seal. Only foods that are 95 to 100 percent organic (and GMO-free) can use the USDA Organic label. . 100% Organic – Foods that are completely organic or made with 100% organic ingredients may display the USDA seal. . Organic – Foods that contain at least 95% organic ingredients may display the USDA seal. . Made with organic ingredients – Foods that contain at least 70% organic ingredients will not display the USDA seal but may list specific organic ingredients on the front of the package. . Contains organic ingredients – Foods that contain less than 70% organic ingredients will not display the USDA seal but may list specific organic ingredients on the information panel of the package. . The scariest one, in my opinion, is the “Made with organic ingredients”. While they are not allowed to use the USDA Organic seal, many times seeing the word “organic” in any capacity can lead to a purchase. The issue with this is that there are still 30% of the ingredients that can be complete trash. . Just because it says “Organic” shouldn’t make it synonymous with “good for you”.

Buying Organic? Know Your Labels by @reformsandc
.
Let’s talk about organic products and how they’re labeled. They are everywhere, and similar to the fat free phenomena of the early 2000’s where everyone thought that fat was awful for you, the same conclusion can be drawn for organic products except this time on the opposite end of the spectrum. People think that if something is labeled organic that it has to be good for you.
.
Wait, I thought all organic labels meant the same thing? Not necessarily. Let me explain.
.
There are a few different categories of “organic foods”. When you’re shopping for organic foods in the U.S., look for the “USDA Organic” seal. Only foods that are 95 to 100 percent organic (and GMO-free) can use the USDA Organic label.
.
100% Organic – Foods that are completely organic or made with 100% organic ingredients may display the USDA seal.
.
Organic – Foods that contain at least 95% organic ingredients may display the USDA seal.
.
Made with organic ingredients – Foods that contain at least 70% organic ingredients will not display the USDA seal but may list specific organic ingredients on the front of the package.
.
Contains organic ingredients – Foods that contain less than 70% organic ingredients will not display the USDA seal but may list specific organic ingredients on the information panel of the package.
.
The scariest one, in my opinion, is the “Made with organic ingredients”. While they are not allowed to use the USDA Organic seal, many times seeing the word “organic” in any capacity can lead to a purchase. The issue with this is that there are still 30% of the ingredients that can be complete trash.
.
Just because it says “Organic” shouldn’t make it synonymous with “good for you”.

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By | 2018-06-15T06:04:49+00:00 June 14th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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