Better Workouts With Autoregulation — 🗣Before diving in I want you to know that I do not recommend this for beginners, only intermediate and up. Build a good base with a standard program first. :) — I also want to note that this type of training is not for everyone — Thus far my clients have been about 60% in favor of it because they like the idea of having a number of reps set in stone. — With that out of the way, I’ll tell you why I like Autoregulation and the theory behind it. — Autoregulation allows every person doing the workout to get what they need out of it. What I mean by that is that when there is a specific number of sets and reps such as 3×10 in the example above that can be too much for one and not near enough for the other. For argument sake lets assume that we will be working with a fairly set weight, so going down to half of your regular working weight just to get (x) reps wont be the goal here. — Its important to set some parameters first. When using Autoregulation you should have a “stopping” point. Training to failure in this setting means perfect reps. If your technique will probably fail next rep — rack it. I like using 3/fail week 1, 2/fail week 2, 1/fail week 3 or similar. If you are using 3/fail and you think you have 15 perfect reps, you’d stop at 12. Make sense? Thanks @rpstrength for turning me on to this concept and making me give it more thought. — If you’re trying to gain lean muscle, in order to be in the hypertrophy rep range you may estimate — even better if you know — your 10RM, set it a little lower for week 1 and progress from there depending on how many reps you do. For hypertrophy its best to stay anywhere from 8-15 reps, so, if you get 18 reps on set 1 you could add more weight, if you only got 5? Go down a bit. This works for whatever training phase you’re in, you’d just adjust the RM you’re working off of (i.e 5,6,8 etc.). — If you’ve tried both methods which do you prefer? Let me know!

//Better Workouts With Autoregulation — 🗣Before diving in I want you to know that I do not recommend this for beginners, only intermediate and up. Build a good base with a standard program first. :) — I also want to note that this type of training is not for everyone — Thus far my clients have been about 60% in favor of it because they like the idea of having a number of reps set in stone. — With that out of the way, I’ll tell you why I like Autoregulation and the theory behind it. — Autoregulation allows every person doing the workout to get what they need out of it. What I mean by that is that when there is a specific number of sets and reps such as 3×10 in the example above that can be too much for one and not near enough for the other. For argument sake lets assume that we will be working with a fairly set weight, so going down to half of your regular working weight just to get (x) reps wont be the goal here. — Its important to set some parameters first. When using Autoregulation you should have a “stopping” point. Training to failure in this setting means perfect reps. If your technique will probably fail next rep — rack it. I like using 3/fail week 1, 2/fail week 2, 1/fail week 3 or similar. If you are using 3/fail and you think you have 15 perfect reps, you’d stop at 12. Make sense? Thanks @rpstrength for turning me on to this concept and making me give it more thought. — If you’re trying to gain lean muscle, in order to be in the hypertrophy rep range you may estimate — even better if you know — your 10RM, set it a little lower for week 1 and progress from there depending on how many reps you do. For hypertrophy its best to stay anywhere from 8-15 reps, so, if you get 18 reps on set 1 you could add more weight, if you only got 5? Go down a bit. This works for whatever training phase you’re in, you’d just adjust the RM you’re working off of (i.e 5,6,8 etc.). — If you’ve tried both methods which do you prefer? Let me know!

Better Workouts With Autoregulation — 🗣Before diving in I want you to know that I do not recommend this for beginners, only intermediate and up. Build a good base with a standard program first. :) — I also want to note that this type of training is not for everyone — Thus far my clients have been about 60% in favor of it because they like the idea of having a number of reps set in stone. — With that out of the way, I’ll tell you why I like Autoregulation and the theory behind it. — Autoregulation allows every person doing the workout to get what they need out of it. What I mean by that is that when there is a specific number of sets and reps such as 3×10 in the example above that can be too much for one and not near enough for the other. For argument sake lets assume that we will be working with a fairly set weight, so going down to half of your regular working weight just to get (x) reps wont be the goal here. — Its important to set some parameters first. When using Autoregulation you should have a “stopping” point. Training to failure in this setting means perfect reps. If your technique will probably fail next rep — rack it. I like using 3/fail week 1, 2/fail week 2, 1/fail week 3 or similar. If you are using 3/fail and you think you have 15 perfect reps, you’d stop at 12. Make sense? Thanks @rpstrength for turning me on to this concept and making me give it more thought. — If you’re trying to gain lean muscle, in order to be in the hypertrophy rep range you may estimate — even better if you know — your 10RM, set it a little lower for week 1 and progress from there depending on how many reps you do. For hypertrophy its best to stay anywhere from 8-15 reps, so, if you get 18 reps on set 1 you could add more weight, if you only got 5? Go down a bit. This works for whatever training phase you’re in, you’d just adjust the RM you’re working off of (i.e 5,6,8 etc.). — If you’ve tried both methods which do you prefer? Let me know!

Better Workouts With Autoregulation
—
🗣Before diving in I want you to know that I do not recommend this for beginners, only intermediate and up. Build a good base with a standard program first. :)
—
I also want to note that this type of training is not for everyone — Thus far my clients have been about 60% in favor of it because they like the idea of having a number of reps set in stone.
—
With that out of the way, I’ll tell you why I like Autoregulation and the theory behind it.
—
Autoregulation allows every person doing the workout to get what they need out of it. What I mean by that is that when there is a specific number of sets and reps such as 3×10 in the example above that can be too much for one and not near enough for the other. For argument sake lets assume that we will be working with a fairly set weight, so going down to half of your regular working weight just to get (x) reps wont be the goal here.
—
Its important to set some parameters first. When using Autoregulation you should have a “stopping” point. Training to failure in this setting means perfect reps. If your technique will probably fail next rep — rack it. I like using 3/fail week 1, 2/fail week 2, 1/fail  week 3 or similar. If you are using 3/fail and you think you have 15 perfect reps, you’d stop at 12. Make sense? Thanks @rpstrength for turning me on to this concept and making me give it more thought.
—
If you’re trying to gain lean muscle, in order to be in the hypertrophy rep range you may estimate — even better if you know — your 10RM, set it a little lower for week 1 and progress from there depending on how many reps you do. For hypertrophy its best to stay anywhere from 8-15 reps, so, if you get 18 reps on set 1 you could add more weight, if you only got 5? Go down a bit. This works for whatever training phase you’re in, you’d just adjust the RM you’re working off of (i.e 5,6,8 etc.).
—
If you’ve tried both methods which do you prefer? Let me know!

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By | 2018-05-16T18:04:05+00:00 May 16th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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